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LETTERS

He hopes area nursing homes will find open-air solutions soon

A resident at The Leonard Florence Center for Living listens to All Good Things, a three-piece-band, on March 20. The center invited the band to perform outside so that residents could listen from their windows and balconies.
A resident at The Leonard Florence Center for Living listens to All Good Things, a three-piece-band, on March 20. The center invited the band to perform outside so that residents could listen from their windows and balconies.Erin Clark/Globe Staff

For those with elderly parents in nursing homes, I would like to say don’t despair (“Families deem ‘no visits’ edict essential, painful,” Page A1, March 24). My mother’s central Florida nursing home was similarly locked down in mid-March. They didn’t even let spouses living in different sections of the facility (for example, assisted living vs. nursing) visit with each other. To their credit, they worked out a system fairly quickly where nursing home residents could be taken outdoors to the gardens where they receive visitors.

Visits are by appointment only, and procedures have been established to prevent close contact, but visits were resumed. Since spring has begun, I expect that Massachusetts nursing homes will be able to implement similar procedures and resume limited family visits.

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James W. Slack

Lexington