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Photos: Mass. cranberry bogs are ready for harvest

Luis Canales from New Bedford raked cranberries that are corraled into a circle and fed into a large suction hose under the water at the Edgewood Bogs in Carver.
Luis Canales from New Bedford raked cranberries that are corraled into a circle and fed into a large suction hose under the water at the Edgewood Bogs in Carver.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

Mother Nature gifted a perfect day for cranberry harvesting Thursday in the heart of cranberry country, south of Boston. Under a deep blue sky and temperatures in the mid-70s, workers waded in hip-boots into the cold bogs to harvest the bright crimson berries that have been a staple on Thanksgiving tables for decades. Edgewood Bogs grows a variety of cranberries on its 250 acres of bogs spread out in Carver. Wet harvesting began Sept. 21 and will continue until Nov. 1. This year has been different since the company started 75 years ago. “COVID has affected us this time of year when it’s difficult for the workers to stay 6 feet apart,” said Jarrod Rhodes, the son of owner Matt Rhodes. Jarrod oversees the day-to-day operations. His hard-working employees are all Puerto Ricans who commute from New Bedford. Rafael Nieves is the longest-working employee with 33 years of experience. He usually mans the controls atop the loud and dangerous conveyor belt machine that lifts and cleans the berries and drops them into waiting 18-wheelers. “We take care of ourselves real good.” Nieves said. “So far so good. We have rules. Anybody who feels sick stays home.” he said.

Miguel Galarsa from New Bedford pulled a long strap to wrangle floating cranberries into a circle at the Edgewood Bogs in Carver.
Miguel Galarsa from New Bedford pulled a long strap to wrangle floating cranberries into a circle at the Edgewood Bogs in Carver. John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
A mound of cranberries sat in a truck at Edgewood Bogs.
A mound of cranberries sat in a truck at Edgewood Bogs.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
Rafael Nieves controlled the conveyor belt as cranberries fell into a waiting truck.
Rafael Nieves controlled the conveyor belt as cranberries fell into a waiting truck.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
Luis Canales (left) and Miguel Galarsa entered a cranberry pond to start corralling cranberries into a circle.
Luis Canales (left) and Miguel Galarsa entered a cranberry pond to start corralling cranberries into a circle.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
Miguel Galarsa pulled a long strap to guide floating cranberries into a circle.
Miguel Galarsa pulled a long strap to guide floating cranberries into a circle.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
Luis Canales tossed escaped cranberries that are corralled into a circle and fed into a large suction hose under the water.
Luis Canales tossed escaped cranberries that are corralled into a circle and fed into a large suction hose under the water.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
Cranberries fell from a conveyor belt into a waiting truck.
Cranberries fell from a conveyor belt into a waiting truck.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
Miguel Galarsa walked back to shore after working for several hours at Edgewood Bogs in Carver.
Miguel Galarsa walked back to shore after working for several hours at Edgewood Bogs in Carver.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff


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